A mowed-down world

Scott blew Oscar’s cover. Or, more precisely, Scott began the spring restoration of Oscar’s borrowed meadow by mowing sections back to their proverbial studs. Now Oscar, the neighbor’s cat who, despite my protests, spends the preponderance of his time in my meadow satisfying his hunger for birds, mice, voles and frogs, is disoriented, if I interpret circling and circling and circling cat behavior correctly.

Before meadow mowing photos above; mowed below. Can you find Oscar in the mowed shot? Hint: in the middle ground heading towards the unmowed little bluestem.

 

Early spring brings changes in addition to the annual mowing of rotating sections of the meadow. The Red-winged blackbirds returned in time to be counted in the Feeder Watch Project (mid February). They didn’t start with their reliable “spring’s here” gurgling call until a few weeks later. (Do they await the calendar arrival of spring?) The first American robin came back for St Patrick’s Day; now there are at least three hopping, stopping, listening then lunging.

Days now begin with an hour’s worth of birdsong although the full chorus isn’t assembled yet. The peepers are calling insistently from sunset until well into the evening from the trees beside the pond.

Buds are swelling with the longer daylight, the grass is greening in the rains and the Sanguinaria canadensis (blood-root) is blooming.

But away from the meadow, early spring this year has been like no other. I can almost sympathize with unwelcome Oscar circling aimlessly aghast at what has happened. “His” meadow, like “my” world, has been mowed down. Of course, the meadow will regrow. What are the odds that the larger world will do the same especially in a season? I hope greater than it feels right now.

 

 

4 comments
  1. Sarah Allen said:

    Hello, I met you when visiting my cousin Cynthia Foreman some years ago. I have enjoyed your posts and this one is particularly lovely and moving. Be well in these times.
    Sarah Allen

    • Sarah, Thank you for your comment. I was just looking at photos of Cynthia the other day (with all my social distancing spare time). I do miss her! Take care, Susan

  2. Nancy Pontone said:

    Hi Susan,

    Good blog post. Sorry about the pesky cat. Nature is waking up in Wakefield none the less. Any more news about the “goose” egg.

    The weather here over the past couple of days has kept me from gardening. It’s my solace during this virus induced isolation. I had practice for this three years ago when I was in recovery from vasculitis and just stayed home.

    Did you see my email about the Doolittle prints? Carol wants the set on the right. I hope you are interested in the mountainous fir tree set. I love them both.

    Steve’s nomination of the Kensington Hospital to the Philadelphia Register of Historic Places prompted an article by the *Philadelphia Inquirer’s* architect reviewer Inga Saffron in Sunday’s paper. It’s attached for you to see.

    Stay well. Love, Nancy

    On Sun, Mar 29, 2020 at 8:54 PM Meadow Restoration wrote:

    > Susan Marcus posted: “Scott blew Oscar’s cover. Or, more precisely, Scott > began the spring restoration of Oscar’s borrowed meadow by mowing sections > back to their proverbial studs. Now Oscar, the neighbor’s cat who, despite > my protests, spends the preponderance of his time in ” >

  3. Judy Staples said:

    Grateful for Mother Nature which doesn’t mind the virus. As David Hockney paints and says, “they can’t cancel the Spring.”

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: